Camellia Oil – Camellia Oil for Skin

 Camellia Oil | Camellia Oil for Skin

We use Cold-Pressed Certified Organic Camellia Oil.

Camellia Oil – Plant Description

Tree or shrub from the high altitude mountains of Japan and China, which blossoms with beautiful flowers throughout the winter. There are around 200 different varieties.

History & Use

Camellia Oil has been used on the skin for thousands of years having been once regarded as the Emperor’s oil, and oil from the japonica species is said to be the beauty secret of the Japanese Geishas! Originating in Eastern Asia, the Oleifera species is the one that the oil is normally extracted from (also known as tea seed oil), whereas the Sinensis species is used to produce Chinese teas- black, white, green and oolong tea.

Camellia Oil is also used extensively as a cooking oil in Asia and beyond, as it has a high smoke point and nutritional content, having been shown to reduce bad cholesterol.

Chemical Composition

High in polyphenols (antioxidants which aid moisture retention and cell renewal). High in omega oils, around 85% is monounsaturated Omega 9 Oleic acid – a moisturising compound which is able to penetrate the skin deeply, and nourish it. It is also a source of Omega 3 and 6 (Essential Fatty Acids). Camellia oil also contains squalane and plant collagen.

Camellia Oil for Skin

Few oils compare with Camellia. It benefits all skin types- nourishing and moisturising dry skin, balancing oily skin, and its antioxidant compounds help stop skin damage from ageing and the environment. It is one of the fastest absorbed oils, and takes into the skin its moisturising and regenerating properties. It leaves the skin with a radiance and it also helps soften and reduce wrinkles. Regular use results in a refreshed, glowing and replenished appearance, so it’s no wonder you’ll find it in all of these blends:

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

£7.50£22.00
£18.00£38.00
£5.75£16.50
£7.50£22.00
£7.50£22.00

Image: By Scott from USA (Franklinia alatamaha 1a.jpg) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Leave a Reply