Moringa Oil Description History & Skincare Properties

Moringa Tree

You may have heard about Moringa, but perhaps you’d like to know more about it! Read below to learn a little about this wonderful tree.

Moringa Plant Description

INCI name: Moringa oleifera

The Moringa tree is known by over 200 names including The Miracle Tree, and is a fast-growing drought-resistant plant, that likes dry hot conditions. Indigenous to India, it is now grown in many countries throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America, although India is the biggest grower.

A Brief History of Moringa

There is evidence of Moringa leaves being used as a medicinal herb over 4000 years ago in Northern India. Ayurvedic medicine states 300 diseases that can be prevented by Moringa.

The tree was spread eastward to Asia, and also westward to Egypt and the Mediterranean, then to the Americas.

The ancient Egyptians used Moringa oil to protect their skin from the harsh desert weather, as well as to keep skin soft and smelling sweet. Amphorae of the oil were found in tombs in the Valley of the Kings, for use in the afterlife. This puts the oil up there as prized by the Pharaoh.

The Egyptians introduced it to the Greeks and Romans, and beyond.

How does Moringa Oil Benefit the Skin?

Moringa seed oil contains as high as 72% Oleic Omega 9 acid, which penetrates the skin deeply nourishing it, as well as aiding regeneration. It also contains Palmitic and Stearic acids.

It is said to give a luminous quality to the skin whilst balancing oil production as it purifies the skin, meaning it is great for congested or problem skin.

It is used on all skin types – nourishing dry, balancing oily, clearing congested and replenishing ageing, everyone can benefit from this amazing plant extract!

Find it in: Blue Labelle biologique Moringa & Raspberry Seed Face Oil (10ml & 30ml) 

Blue Labelle biologique Moringa & Raspberry Seed Oil

 

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Image: Forest & Kim Starr [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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